Scientology

The Master, the highly expected movie ‘loosely-based’ on Scientology by Paul Thomas Anderson, will be screening soon. We took this opportunity to remind ourselves of the Scientology’s well-calculated totalitarian identity which gives us the creeps.

«By lowering the endurance of a person, a group, or nation, and by constant degradation and defamation, it is possible to induce, thus, a state of shock which will receive adequately any command given.» — L. Ron Hubbard, “Brainwashing Manual”, p. 34.








In 1951, Hubbard introduced the electropsychometer (E-meter for short), a kind of galvanometer, as an auditing aid. Based on a design by Hubbard, the device is held by Scientologists to be a useful tool in detecting changes in a person’s state of mind.



The controversies involving the Church and its critics, some of them ongoing, include:
-Scientology’s disconnection policy, in which members are encouraged to cut off all contact with friends or family members who are “antagonistic” to Scientology.
-The death of a Scientologist Lisa McPherson while in the care of the Church. (Robert Minton sponsored the multi-million dollar law suit against Scientology for the death of McPherson. In May 2004, McPherson’s estate and the Church of Scientology reached a confidential settlement.)
-Criminal activities committed on behalf of the Church or directed by Church officials (Operation Snow White, Operation Freakout).
-Conflicting statements about L. Ron Hubbard’s life, in particular accounts of Hubbard discussing his intent to start a religion for profit and of his service in the military.
-Scientology’s harassment and litigious actions against its critics encouraged by its Fair Game policy.
-Attempts to legally force search engines such as Google and Yahoo! to omit any webpages critical of Scientology from their search engines (and in Google’s case, AdSense), or at least the first few search pages.
-Allegations by former high-ranking Scientologists that David Miscavige beats and demoralizes staff and that physical violence by superiors towards staff working for them is a common occurrence in the church. Scientology spokesman Tommy Davis denied these claims and provided witnesses to rebut them.
-In October 2009, a French court found the Church of Scientology guilty of organized fraud. Four officers of the organization were fined and given suspended prison sentences of up to 2 years. The Church of Scientology said it would appeal the judgment. Prosecutors had hoped to achieve a ban of Scientology in France, but due to a temporary change in French law, which “made it impossible to dissolve a legal entity on the grounds of fraud”, no ban was pronounced. The sentence was confirmed by appeal court in February 2012.
-In November 2009, Australian Senator Nick Xenophon used a speech in Federal Parliament to allege that the Church of Scientology is a criminal organization. Based on letters from former followers of the religion, he said that there were “allegations of forced imprisonment, coerced abortions, and embezzlement of church funds, of physical violence and intimidation, blackmail and the widespread and deliberate abuse of information obtained by the organization”[254]








A controversial part of the Scientology justice system is the Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF). When a Sea Org member is accused of a violation, such as lying, sexual misconduct, dereliction of duty, or failure to comply with Church policy, a Committee of Evidence examines the case. If the charge is substantiated, the individual may accept expulsion from the Sea Org or participate in the RPF to become eligible to rejoin the Sea Org. The RPF involves a daily regimen of five hours of auditing or studying, eight hours of work, often physical labor, such as building renovation, and at least seven hours of sleep. Douglas E. Cowan and David G. Bromley state that scholars and observers have come to radically different conclusions about the RPF and whether it is “voluntary or coercive, therapeutic or punitive”.

«Rehabilitation Project Force, the cult’s internal gulag where bad people are sent for punishment or “rehabilitation”; a brain washing and penal organization.» — The ARS Acronym/Terminology FAQ v3.5 by Martin Hunt.















This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on November 16, 2012 at 10:36 am, filed under Dematerialization, Fashion, Glam Chaos, Information Wars, Other ecstatics, Political glam, Trending, Various, Visual ecstasy. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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