Cover design for Diplo & Olivier Twizt

Label: Mad Decent
The song is amazing!!!! It will be out 8 November. We’re currently making its music video.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on October 18, 2011 at 10:15 am, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Graphic design, Music, Pinar&Viola, Published, Typography, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

The Importance of Being Sexy

We’re happy to invite you to the online launch of the website The Importance of Being Sexy, designed by us.
The opening will take place on October 28th and will be hosted by the Dutch public broadcast channel VPRO and Viewpoint Productions.

The Importance of Being Sexy is a website which questions the effect of porn in the female sensuality in the 21st century.
The website is a part of a series of projects initiated by the remarkable Dutch documentary maker Sunny Bergman.

The project looks into a culture that applauds women who promote their sexiness. It exposes the mechanisms leading to confuse raunchiness with femininity and sexual approval with power. The website is an online platform for women to share their sensual experiences, also an online collection of sensual webcam interviews that Bergman made with women from all over the world expressing their intimate experiences.
Starting from 28 October, you can make online confessions and browse in an Erotic Art Gallery on www.theimportanceofbeingsexy.com

We’ll be happy to share your stories together with ours.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on October 10, 2011 at 5:07 pm, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Graphic design, Internet, Pinar&Viola, Political glam, Published, Typography, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Diva Opaque special edition poster

We recently finished this poster for the online design magazine Fontanel. A different edition of it will take part in Don’t Believe The Type exhibition at Ship of Fools gallery, that Fontanel will organizes together with the Graphic Design Festival Breda and design agency Trapped in Suburbia. The opening of the exhibition will be held on October 7th. Address: Korte Voorhout 20 2511 CX The Hague The Netherlands

We prepared a special edition poster that one of our 150 divas from our previous capsule collection Diva Opaque: Anonymous Guardians of Intimacy.
Size: 50x70cm. If you guys want one, just send an email to bureau@pinar-viola.com

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on September 21, 2011 at 1:14 pm, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Exhibition, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Political glam, Poster, Typography, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Album artwork for Anatopia

Album artwork design for Anatopia. The album will be released as a vinyl and in online music libraries. You can listen to their former album here. Album releasing party will be held on 23rd of September. We’ll soon post more information concerning the release and the vinyl.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on August 31, 2011 at 12:46 pm, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Friends, Graphic design, Music, Pinar&Viola, Poster, Typography, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

GHE20 G0THIK

Ghe20 G0th1k
MIXTAPES

Ghe20 G0th1k is a social experiment in NYC turning into booty brawl. Voguing is a respected art here, and it’s not exclusive to the gays. While scene queens and party divas strut about, everyone is welcome to share the dark dance floor. Don’t expect to be coddled though: The patrons of this mostly queer party have absolutely no qualms about testing your abilities. Here, you earn your way to the middle of the dance floor through friendly dance-offs that prove you too can keep up with the fast-paced drums that provide the foundation for the club-meets-goth fete. When we walked in around 12:30 a.m., resident DJ Venus X was on the decks, dancing along to a quickly mixed set of Baltimore Club, R-Kelly (what? yes!), Bollywood remixes, and sissy bounce, akin to what Girl Talk would do if he had a taste for bass. “It’s a democratic approach to music that’s inherently queer,” Venus explains later. “It was initially dark wave and juke, and started to expand from there. We try to stay away from obvious American music and instead do a lot of black house, Middle Eastern music, stuff like that.” —> An extract of Puja Patel’s review on blogs.villagevoice.com

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on August 19, 2011 at 10:10 am, filed under Graphic design, Internet, Music, Other ecstatics, Poster, Typography. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

SSS booklet design

We recently designed the graduation booklet of Sandberg Instituut Amsterdam’s fine arts department. Each student is presented with a positive populist art quote.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on July 13, 2011 at 12:09 pm, filed under Art, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Published, Typography. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

SSS invitation

SSS – Sandberg Service Show
Graduation Show Sandberg Fine Arts Department

De Service Garage
Cruquiusweg 79, Amsterdam
Fri 8 July, 17h00 till 21h00, Opening
Fri 8 July, 22h00 till 3h00, Graduation party

Invitation and catalogue design: Pinar&Viola

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on July 6, 2011 at 11:17 pm, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Exhibition, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Typography, Vernissage, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Ecstatic surfaces for Cobra Museum

Poster and invitation for Sowing & Weeding exhibition at Cobra Museum.

The exhibition shows examples of folk culture in contemporary art and opposes itself to the current anti cultural climate of Dutch right wing politics. The Cobra movement can be stated as an universal positive populist art which wanted to liberate the creativity of mankind. Cobra artists aimed to make art for and by everyone, irrespective of class, race, intellect and educational level.

This poster is an ecstatic surface where Cobra revives in the folk art of the contemporary: digital folklore.

The visual statement is an upgrade of the conventional understanding of the Cobra movement. On the surface, the impulsive and intuitive beauty of digital folklore is outshined and the folk art of today is flourished on the vernacular world wide web, all parading with hijacked Cobra creatures.

We’ll currently designing a gigantic digital mural painting for the entrance of the exhibition.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on June 3, 2011 at 4:55 pm, filed under Art, Ecstatic Surface Design, Exhibition, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Poster, Typography, Vernissage, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Détox Dior poster

We were invited by Chaumont Poster Festival 2011 to take part in the exhibition 13 a Cheval.
This poster is a reaction towards the anti-Semitic words of John Galliano (28 Feb).
John Galliano, having the looks of a gypsy pirate created ecstatic couture. It was clear that he drew it’s inspiration from minorities and different cultures. As Pinar&Viola, we have always felted affiliated with his way of working. Thus, when the upsetting news made the headlines, it was a complete stroke for us that these anti-Semitic remarks were coming from his mouth.

Physical perfection has always been an obsession in the cult of fashion. This made an odd connection in our minds with fascism’s antidemocratic aesthetics.
While making a poster which speaks about the ephemerality of the fashion industry, we made use of the new African patterns, next rave in the fashion industry.

This poster is silkscreened by Les Arts Graphiques, Strasbourg.


Our poster is shown in the catalogue of Chaumont 2011 together with our terror battle opponent, Mr. Michiel Schuurman, the wizard.
We started a terror battle in 2010 between us and him, on which one of us would create more graphical terror.
What do you think who earned more points on this one? Send your answer to bureau@pinar-viola.com.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on May 23, 2011 at 8:40 pm, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Exhibition, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Political glam, Poster, Typography. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Brilliantly disorientating

It’s the second time that we’re posting a video of Mr. West. The first one, after seeing Civilization in The Standard Hotel’s elevator in New York, he commissioned Marco Brambilla for his viode Power, and Tom Kan for the second one. The simiarity between the credits sequence of Gaspard Noé’s Enter the Void and the typographical sequences of Kanye West – All Of The Lights ft. Rihanna, Kid Cudi video is evident.
Please see the article A soul drifting in neon limbo of Rick Poynor on the treatment of words and typography in the contemporary feature films, and focuses on Wes Anderson and Gaspar Noé.

A soul drifting in neon limbo
By Rick Poynor

Published in Eye no. 78 vol. 20 (text in full)

Even in an era as typographically aware as our own it is rare to find feature film directors who treat words and typography as an integral component of their work. Jean-Luc Godard’s oeuvre, especially the classic films of the 1960s, remains the benchmark against which all typographic film-making must be measured.

Only two contemporary directors, Wes Anderson and Gaspar Noé, use words and type to reflect their cinematic vision with any consistency, though their style and aims could hardly be more different.

Hipster or not, Anderson has an old-fashioned, almost literary, taste for chapter-like breaks in his films’ narrative, and his typography, generally based on Futura, also works as a form of self-branding. This elegant, imaginary Anderson-world has undeniable flair and humour, though the self-reflexivity is too whimsical to pose much of challenge.

Noé’s use of the word as a filmic device is much closer to Godard’s: he wants to disrupt and disturb. In his first feature, Seul contre tous (I Stand Alone, 1998), an alarming tale about a butcher at the end of his tether, which unfolds as a scathing, non-stop monologue, he introduces sections with inter-titles in huge capitals – ‘Justice’, ‘Morality’, ‘Living is a selfish act’. A warning that viewers have 30 seconds to leave the screening, followed by the flashing word ‘Danger’, prefaces one particularly gruelling sequence. Noé might be toying with the audience but the frenzied hammer blows of the lettering add to the film’s unnerving harshness.

In terms of placement, Noé’s use of type in his latest film, Enter the Void, could seem more conventional: he confines it to the beginning and end. Even so the type plays the same vital role – see also Irréversible (2002) – as a means of expressing the film’s dark vision. Enter the Void’s titles can be viewed online (UK DVD release is scheduled for April 2011) but the best place to experience them is with the film, on a big screen in a cinema, as an overwhelming fusion of image and sound.

The sequence, directed by Noé with design by the Paris-based Japanese art director Tom Kan, is brilliantly disorientating. From the first frame, it is like being seized by an irresistible vortex of brain-scrambling sensation and sucked down into the film’s chemically modified consciousness. The type fills the entire screen and the editing is precision-welded to the stuttering beats of ‘Freak’, a 2003 track by the English techno band LFO. The credits flash by so fast that it is impossible to absorb them all, though a few names register in the visual noise.

As a piece of graphic design, the titles are both crude and sophisticated. This is an area of tacky popular graphics previously visited for its experimental potential by the late P. Scott Makela, The Designers Republic and Jonathan Barnbrook.

Kan exploits every trick in the commercial lettering manual: drop shadows, bevelled edges, Gothic type, neon type, 1960s futurism, shattered letters, melting letters. Spliced together with Japanese characters and subjected to jittery filters and treatments, this maelstrom of words signals the delirious, immersive excitement of Noé’s Tokyo, a city of nightclubs, logos, adverts, neon, throbbing music, drugs and sexual sleaze, a place where spiritual compasses can easily spin out of control.

Enter the Void’s psychedelic spectacle of a young man’s soul drifting after death has divided audiences. Some see it as a work of exhilarating technical innovation; some find it overblown and tedious. Some type enthusiasts complained that the film failed to live up to its stroboscopic titles. This response seems not only to misunderstand how titles can condense and reformat a film’s themes, turning narrative detail into graphic shorthand, but also to overlook Noé’s broader use of typography in his work as prompt, goad and pseudo-didactic audience-baiter.

After the title sequence comes the single word ‘Enter’. Enter the Void aspires to be a door of perception and we have been invited, or dared, to venture inside. Not until the end is the phrase completed, when it transpires that the whole film is clamped, like a big queasy burger laced with hallucinogens, between great slabs of type. The words are not, then, purely functional elements that could be cast aside without changing anything. The type is an intrinsic part of the void’s texture and meaning.

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on March 10, 2011 at 11:24 am, filed under Music, Other ecstatics, Typography, Video, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Launch at SPRMRKT


Official launch of Pinar&Viola’s Ecstatic Surface Design 2011:
THE CREDIT CARD COLLECTION

Address: SPRMRKT, Rozengracht 191-193
Date & Time: Thursday 14 October 2010 from 5PM till 8PM
Dj: Emile Zile a.k.a. Bushdoof
This event is sponsored by Bols Genever

This entry was written by Pinar&Viola, posted on October 10, 2010 at 11:44 am, filed under Ecstatic Surface Design, Exhibition, Graphic design, Pinar&Viola, Poster, Typography, Visual ecstasy. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.